HOME-CURED BACON. 12/07/13
Saltpetre is a preserving agent that kills bacteria, but it’s quite hard to find. Try convincing your butcher to give you some (you only need a tiny amount), or you can find it on the internet. Curing salt is a fine alternative, but follow the packet instructions as you will need less of it. You will also need a non-metallic container that fits in the fridge.
INGREDIENTS METHOD

Makes 2½kg/ 5½lb

 

60g/2oz coarse rock salt

40g/1½oz fine table salt

40g/1½oz dark muscovado

3 bay leaves

1 sprig of rosemary, leaves picked

A few sprigs of thyme, leaves picked

½ tbsp black peppercorns

½ tsp saltpetre

2½kg/5½lb pork belly, deboned, skin on

 

 

Mix the salts and sugar in a bowl. In a pestle and mortar, bash the herbs and peppercorns, then combine with the salts, sugar and saltpetre. Cover the base of a non-metallic container with a little of the cure mix, then divide the remaining mix into half. Rub one half of the mixture into the pork belly. Place the pork, flesh side down, in the container and cover with the remaining mixture. Cover with a lid or clingfilm and place in the fridge.

 

Check the pork every day for the next five days, turning it and rubbing in the cure mix every day and pouring off any excess liquid.

 

On the sixth day, remove the pork and discard the contents of the container. Rinse the pork under cold water until all the cure mix has been washed away. Pat dry, then place it on a meat hook and hang it to dry in a cool place, such as a cellar, larder or a cool garage. You can dry it as long as you like, but two days should suffice. You will now have your own “green” bacon. Don’t worry if a white mould appears; it’s harmless, just rub it off. Remove the skin, leaving as much fat as possible. Slice to the desired thickness (you might find it easiest to place it in the freezer for a couple of hours).

MANGO CHUTNEY.
09/01/14
BRITISH KIMCHI.
09/01/14
TURKISH-STYLE FERMENTED TURNIPS.
09/01/14
APRICOT JAM.
26/07/13
BLOOD ORANGE CURD.
18/03/13
RHUBARB AND GINGER PICKLE.
04/03/13
HOME-CURED BACON. 12/07/13
Saltpetre is a preserving agent that kills bacteria, but it’s quite hard to find. Try convincing your butcher to give you some (you only need a tiny amount), or you can find it on the internet. Curing salt is a fine alternative, but follow the packet instructions as you will need less of it. You will also need a non-metallic container that fits in the fridge.
INGREDIENTS

Makes 2½kg/ 5½lb

 

60g/2oz coarse rock salt

40g/1½oz fine table salt

40g/1½oz dark muscovado

3 bay leaves

1 sprig of rosemary, leaves picked

A few sprigs of thyme, leaves picked

½ tbsp black peppercorns

½ tsp saltpetre

2½kg/5½lb pork belly, deboned, skin on

 

 

METHOD

Mix the salts and sugar in a bowl. In a pestle and mortar, bash the herbs and peppercorns, then combine with the salts, sugar and saltpetre. Cover the base of a non-metallic container with a little of the cure mix, then divide the remaining mix into half. Rub one half of the mixture into the pork belly. Place the pork, flesh side down, in the container and cover with the remaining mixture. Cover with a lid or clingfilm and place in the fridge.

 

Check the pork every day for the next five days, turning it and rubbing in the cure mix every day and pouring off any excess liquid.

 

On the sixth day, remove the pork and discard the contents of the container. Rinse the pork under cold water until all the cure mix has been washed away. Pat dry, then place it on a meat hook and hang it to dry in a cool place, such as a cellar, larder or a cool garage. You can dry it as long as you like, but two days should suffice. You will now have your own “green” bacon. Don’t worry if a white mould appears; it’s harmless, just rub it off. Remove the skin, leaving as much fat as possible. Slice to the desired thickness (you might find it easiest to place it in the freezer for a couple of hours).

MORE SPICE MIX & SAUCES
CARROT PICKLE. 09/01/14
This is a brilliant accompaniment for rice and curries. Read more
MANGO CHUTNEY. 09/01/14
My mango chutney is fresh and zingy, rather than sweet and cloying. Read more
BRITISH KIMCHI. 09/01/14
My British kimchi, or “Brit-chi”, uses red cabbage, watercress and pears. Read more
TURKISH-STYLE FERMENTED TURNIPS. 09/01/14
It is typical to add a little beetroot to transform these boring coloured vegetables into a glorious vivid pink colour. These need to be left two weeks before eating in order for them to ferment. Read more
APRICOT JAM. 26/07/13
This is jam French-style so isn’t too set. The kernels add a lovely, slightly bitter, almond taste. Read more
BLOOD ORANGE CURD. 18/03/13
This is my seasonal alternative to the classic lemon curd. Spread on toast or use in a Victoria sponge. Read more
RHUBARB AND GINGER PICKLE. 04/03/13
Read more